Thursday, February 9, 2012

Pre-Release Special for Rebecca Ore's Time & Robbery

Aqueduct Press is pleased to announce the publication of Time and Robbery, a new novel by Rebecca Ore, author of Gaia's Toys, Time's Child, Slow Funeral, and other well-received books, as a trade paperback, in March 2012. Aqueduct will be selling the book for $13 through its website until its release date of March 1.

Time and Robbery features the protagonist of Ore's Centuries Ago and Very Fast, Vel, a gay immortal born in Paleolithic who jumps time at will. Unless Vel can help out his younger self, Vel's tribe's descendants—a big chunk of the 21st-century British population—will be eliminated from the timeline. Present-day Vel, though, has problems of his own, so he takes a chance and outs himself (and his talented teen-aged daughter Quince) to Joe Tavistock, a subcontractor on the weak end of the plausible deniability chain dangling off British intelligence, making it Joe’s problem. Joe's superiors are dubious, and Joe doesn't know who to trust. The stakes are high not just for Vel, but for everyone involved.

Rebecca Ore's first book about Vel, Centuries Ago and Very Fast, was a finalist for the Philip K. Dick and the Lambda Awards. As Jeff VanderMeer wrote for Locus Online: “Centuries Ago and Very Fast by Rebecca Ore (from the truly amazing Aqueduct Press) has a kinetic energy and hard-to-define originality that held me captivated from first word to last. Profane—scandalous?—the book wraps stories around stories, combines the surreal with the mundane and every-day.”

Advance Praise

"Rebecca is up to her old tricks here: surprising, puzzling, and delighting us at every turn; and in this sleek, lean detective tale, coolly twisting the tail of Time itself. Ore is that rarest of creatures, a writers' writer that readers also love."   —Terry Bisson, author of Fire on the Mountain and TVA Baby

 "When does a short novel qualify as an epic? When Rebecca Ore writes of centuries of kinfolk, millennia of hot sex, and a few days of investigating an impossible crime. Read this like you'd take a pill pushed into your hand by a stranger in a new nightclub in a city you've never been to. It's worth the trip." —Nick Mamatas, author of Move Under Ground and Sensation

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